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  1. Water Spots on Medical Devices After Washer Cleaning

    Water Spots on Medical Devices After Washer Cleaning
    Q. We are washing stainless medical devices in a washer and are getting water spots. We are using Solujet and Citrajet. What’s causing this problem? A. Water spots typically occur because of two main reasons: the orientation of the parts in the washer is trapping dirty wash water and/or detergent dosing is insufficient. If any items being washed have a shape that can retain dirty wash water, it can sometimes get carried into the next rinse cycle and spread all over all the items being washed. An example of a such a shape would be “U” shapes or cups. Then the parts gets dried and the residue from the dirty wash water leaves water spots. To solve this, load the items in a way to tilt them so they drain completely and do not carry dirty wash water from the wash cycle to the rinse cycle. If this is not an issue, then consider detergent dosing. If you are washing with hard tap water (high in calcium, magnesium and iron), and you are under-dosing the detergent, then there may not be enough chelating agent to tie up the hardness ions. In this case, these ions will precipitate out as metal oxides/hyrdroxides/carbonates that then do not rinse easily and can lead to water spots. Be sure to use at least a 1% Solujet® Low Foaming Phosphate Free Detergent wash solution (10 mL/L) and 1% Citrajet® Low Foaming Acid Cleaner rinse solution (10 mL/L). Also consider using deionized, RO, or distilled water for rinsing, and even washing, which can help completely avoid this problem. Note that high quality water is less important for the wash step.
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  2. High Purity Solvents

    High Purity Solvents

    High Purity Solvents

    High Purity Solvents

    High Purity Solvents

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  3. Passivate: Citric Acid Option with Citranox and Citrajet Detergents

    Passivate: Citric Acid Option with Citranox and Citrajet Detergents

    Q. Surface contamination interferes with formation of protective oxide coating on stainless steel thereby leaving it open to corrosion.

    The stainless steel needs passivation. Can Alconox, Inc. help?

    A. Stainless steels are autopassivating in the sense that the protective oxide passive film is formed spontaneously on exposure to air or moisture.

    Surface contamination, may interfere with the formation of the passive film. The cleaning of these contaminants from the stainless steel surface with citric acid detergent will facilitate passivation by allowing the oxygen access to the surface.

    Passivate by immersing the stainless steel in either a 30% solution (300mL/L) of Citranox® Liquid Acid Cleaner and Detergent or Citrajet® Low-Foam Liquid Acid Cleaner/Rinse at any of the following combination of time and temperature: 70-120 deg F (21-49 deg C)/20 min, 120-140 deg F (49-60 deg C)/10 min, or 140-160 deg F (60-71 deg C)/4 minutes.

    Rinse thoroughly immediately after passivation.

    Final rinse should be in clean water with a final reading of less than 200 ppm total solids. Neutralization is not required.

    Air oxidation will complete passivation.

    Note that this process conforms to ASTM A967-01 Standard Specification for Chemical Passivation Treatments of Stainless Steel Parts.

    If desired, Ferritic and Martensitic steels can be treated with 5% sodium dichromate at 150 deg F (65 deg C) for 30 min to accelerate surface oxidation to form passive oxide layer.

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  4. Determining Optimum Detergency for Liquinox

    Determining Optimum Detergency for Liquinox
    Determining Optimum Detergency for Liquinox

    Q: How do you determine optimum detergency for Liquinox® detergent?

    A: As a general statement, optimum detergency for Liquinox® Critical Cleaning Liquid Detergent is reached at a 1-2% concentration with "optimum" defined as amount of soil removed per unit of detergent used. Maximum detergency is typically reached at a 2-3% concentration with "maximum" defined as the total amount of soil removed per area of substrate without regard to amount of detergent used.

    The maximum cleaning capacity is often achieved at 4 or even 6%. Cleaning capacity is defined as the amount of total parts cleaned or combined amount of residue removed before you have to change out baths.

    If you are trying to clean lots of parts...

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  5. Special Price on Saybolt and Saybolt Wax Chronometers!!

    Special Price on Saybolt and Saybolt Wax Chronometers!!
    Special Price on Saybolt and Saybolt Wax Chronometers!!
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  6. Residue Testing with pH Strips

    Residue Testing with pH Strips

    Q. Can I use pH paper to confirm cleaning and rinsing of labware to comply with lab accreditation requirements?

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  7. Cleaning Denatured Proteins

    Cleaning Denatured Proteins

    Q. We are looking to clean denatured proteins from our medical device along with baked-on desiccated blood that is not removed completely. Manual scraping removes the residual but is not acceptable. Need a cleaner that will dissolve all bio-matter. Cleaning process is to prepare device for autoclave sterilization.

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  8. Closed Solvent Waste Systems for HPLC

    Closed Solvent Waste Systems for HPLC
    Closed Solvent Waste Systems for HPLC

    A Solution for Waste Disposal of Volatile Organic Compounds to Increase Standards of Health

    A major concern in the field of chemical science is the proper care and disposal of hazardous wastes. With high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) machines, solvent wastes must be contained for disposal. However, these liquids are often volatile organic compounds (VOCs), meaning they will easily vaporize in the lab and spread through the air. In order to contain these vapors, which are potential health hazards for people working in the lab, improved waste containment must be implemented. Common lab practices have not been sufficient in containing these vapors.

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  9. This Week in Lab and Cleanroom Supplies

    This Week in Lab and Cleanroom Supplies

    Retire your old worn out unit (regardless of make or model) and replace it with a new Corning® hot plate or stirrer.Corning will reward you with free PYREX® reusable glassware!

    From liquid handling to centrifugation, our lab instruments have been enabling research and innovation for over 50 years. With the quality and reliability you expect from Corning, our equipment and consumable solutions can continue to advance your discoveries, today and long into the future.

    Take advantage of this special limited-time offer!

    Get FREE PYREX® Reusable Glassware

    Replace your tired old hot plate or stirrer taking up space in your lab with a new Corning® hot plate or stirrer. Corning will reward you with free PYREX® reusable glassware!

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  10. This Week in Lab and Cleanroom Supplies

    This Week in Lab and Cleanroom Supplies

    Ensure Ultimate Protection For Staff Health & Safety When it comes to chemical hazards, are you protecting what matters most in your facility?

    New globally harmonized chemical labeling rules have been enacted to protect workers who come into contact with hazardous chemicals. Primary chemical containers are now labeled with new Globally Harmonized System (GHS) icons and cautions. To avoid confusion and protect employees, shouldn’t your secondary containers have the same label information?

    Using Thermo Scientific™ Nalgene™ Right-to-Understand wash bottles labeled with current GHS information provides many benefits:

    • A safer work environment
    • Increased efficiency
    • Fewer accidents and illnesses
    • Greater awareness of hazards, resulting in safer use of chemicals in the
    • workplace and at home

     

    Place an order orders@genlabdirect.com or call 805 376-0901 

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